Launch of the new site
Just For Fun Bow Tournament
Great time at North American Outfitters
Bill Slankard off to a good start
Mark Kennedy of Maryland post first firearm photo
Adam Robke takes first WRTV Staff Buck
Ryan Perry tags a 151" Buck
WRTV ProStaffer Jon Beal takes down a nice IL 8-pointer
WRTV ProStaffer Jon Beal drops a second in 4 days
IL - 2012 Spring Turkey Tag Application
Illinois' New Purple Paint Law
WRTV crew at the ATA show
IL Spring Turkey Season - remaining permits
New ProStaff Positions
IL Spring Turkey Permits Daily Lottery
Illinois Resident Firearm Permit Applications
Welcome our new ProStaffers
IDNR ask Illinois Hunters to report Feral Swine sightings
Loaded PSE Bow Package Raffle
2012 PSE Bow Raffle Winner
Pennington Foodplot Seminar
IDNR - Mowed Crop Fields are considered Baited Areas
Velvet Buck Photo Contest Winner
Passing On The Tradition - Contest Winner
Oct Harvest Photo Contest Winner
2013 - IL Resident Turkey Application
November "Stars and Stripes" contest winner
2012 Success, 2013 Prep Photo Contest Winner
The Wild Times - March 2013 Newsletter
The Wild Times - April 2013 Newsletter
WRTV ProStaffer Ray Phillips puts a bird down
2013 Raffle Winners
Come Join Us Sep 28-29 , 2013
Fall 2013 - Ray Phillips on the board!
2013 IL Youth Firearm Season Oct 12-14
First Day On The Job
Easier in IL to take Kids Hunting
2014 WRTV / PSE Bow Raffle
No More PayPal purchases
Welcome aboard Nate Burgess!
Ray with a Mule Deer
Rhett Bullard with an early season doe
Rhett Bullard - Nov 2 Memories
Brian Pendley on Nov 10
2015 PSE Bow Raffle Winners
2016 Raffle Winners
Dear Waterfowl Hunters:
Due to ongoing drought conditions in Illinois, some farmers are mowing or tilling their unharvested crop fields to collect crop insurance payments. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) reminds hunters that the manipulation, including mowing or tilling, of unharvested crop fields is not a normal agricultural practice for waterfowl hunting purposes. The IDNR has received guidance on this issue from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Federal baiting laws still apply, even during times of drought. Therefore, it is a violation of the baiting laws under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act if scattered grain is not totally removed 10 days prior to hunting. Hunters should familiarize themselves with baiting laws in Illinois. For more information on waterfowl baiting regulations, refer to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service web­site link regarding baiting regulations at http://www.fws.gov/le/waterfowl-hunting-and-baiting.html.
Questions regarding hunting crop fields mowed or tilled due to drought insurance claims; 1. If a standing grain crop is 100% void of any ears (corn field produced no ears), can the field be mowed then hunted? Yes, as long as there is no grain present in the field. A field that produces NO ears of corn will probably be a rare occurrence. 2. If a standing grain crop has any amount of grain present after it is mowed, can it be hunted? No, it is a ?baited area? until 10 days after the complete removal of the grain. 3. Can a standing crop that was mowed be disked and made legal for hunting? The field can only be hunt­ed after all exposed grain has been completely removed or buried for a period of 10 days. Hunters should keep in mind that if a dry field is tilled to the extent that no grain is visibly present, strong winds or the first rain is likely to wash off some covered grain, thus still making it a baited situation. 4. Why can a person not hunt over a mowed area? Under federal baiting regulations, mowing or tilling of a standing crop is not a ?normal agricultural planting, harvesting, post-harvest manipulation, or normal soil stabili­zation practice? as determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s Cooperative Extension Service. Attached to this email are pertaining sections of the 2011-2012 Illinois Digest of Hunting and Trapping Regulations that provide additional information on migratory bird hunting and federal baiting regulations. For questions about federal baiting regulations, please call 217-782-6431, Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. ? 4:30 p.m.
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